Jump to content


Photo

Pesikta de Rav Kahana 7:2


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 feibush

feibush

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 03:27 AM

Shavua Tov to all,
I am brandnew on this forum, so b4 I ask my question just in short:
my name is Fei, I have a sephardic background and was born in South America. Live in Europe for most of my life.

I am working on a long time manuscript and am looking for text (and explanations thereto) of the Pesikta mentioned in the title (sigh).
This has to do with G'ds judgment. I am interested in discussions, regardless of personal opinions. Thank you in advance.
BTW I do read and write Ivrit, but do not speak it all the time since I learned this when I was older.

Fei

#2 warren

warren

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 2,208 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 04:42 AM

You can download a text with commentaries here.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"

#3 Guest_Melech_*

Guest_Melech_*
  • Guests

Posted 05 July 2010 - 05:08 AM

....

#4 warren

warren

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 2,208 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 05:22 AM

Thanks for that link.
Also here as well:
http://www.daat.ac.i...ohen.asp?id=166

I found that one first, but couldn't locate the "2" within chapter 7. There's probably a more precise way of saying that.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"

#5 Guest_Melech_*

Guest_Melech_*
  • Guests

Posted 05 July 2010 - 05:23 AM

....

#6 warren

warren

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 2,208 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 06:00 AM

This is interesting, in the one from daat, there's piksa zayin, "vayihi bechatzi halayla", and in the one from Hebrewbooks, there's parasha zayin, piska "vayehi hamakriv".

They start differently, as well. They turn out to be different books. It seems HB has "Peskita Rabati d'Rav Kahana" and the one at daat is called "Pesikta", which might also be known as "Pesikta d'Rav Kahana" although the daat copy says "attributed to R' Kahana". More about that at the Jewish Encyclopedia and at daat and Facebook. There's a P. Zutra and I have no idea if this is identical to the second source, or if it's a third work, I've found it referred to as either "Leket Tov" or "Lekach Tov".

I don't know which one of them the OP is looking for.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"

#7 warren

warren

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 2,208 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 06:07 AM

"It's incomplete".

No, I meant was "what's that 2 called"? For example, in Tanach a pair of numbers is perek:pasuk, in Mishna it's perek:mishna, in Yerushalmi perek:halacha, some books have siman:siman katan, and I'm probably forgetting some. Is there a book somewhere that explains how to cite Jewish sources? Or maybe two, one for academics and one for Torah scholars.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"

#8 feibush

feibush

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 05 July 2010 - 01:17 PM

Thanks to all who replied to my question.
This is a bit difficult subject. Judaism has no day of "final judgment" as in chritianity and Islam. We believe that the final judgment comes when the maschiach comes and the olam haba.

In Judaism we believe that G'd passes judgment over us 4 times a year (and does not wait for the last day), on Rosh hashanah, Pesach, Shavuot and the final judgment on Yom kippur. I'd appreciate any corrections and/or additions to this. Thank you.

#9 Snag

Snag

    הבל יפצה פי

  • Banned
  • 11,108 posts

Posted 02 May 2011 - 01:41 PM

This is interesting, in the one from daat, there's piksa zayin, "vayihi bechatzi halayla", and in the one from Hebrewbooks, there's parasha zayin, piska "vayehi hamakriv".

They start differently, as well. They turn out to be different books. It seems HB has "Peskita Rabati d'Rav Kahana" and the one at daat is called "Pesikta", which might also be known as "Pesikta d'Rav Kahana" although the daat copy says "attributed to R' Kahana". More about that at the Jewish Encyclopedia and at daat and Facebook. There's a P. Zutra and I have no idea if this is identical to the second source, or if it's a third work, I've found it referred to as either "Leket Tov" or "Lekach Tov".

I don't know which one of them the OP is looking for.

pesikta zutr'sa is a work by the rishon rabbi tuvya, and is also known as the medrash lekach tov. some acharonim refer to this when they say "pesikta" stam. it is different from the other pesikta, which, as you noted, is attributed to the amora rav kahana.
"Spiritual wants and instincts are as various in the human family as are physical appetites, complexions, and features, and a man is only at his best, morally, when he is equipped with the religious garment whose color and shape and size most nicely accommodate themselves to the spiritual complexion, angularities, and stature of the individual who wears it."

"The despotism of heaven is the one absolutely perfect government. An earthly despotism would be the absolutely perfect earthly government, if the conditions were the same; namely, the despot the perfectest individual of the human race, and his lease of life perpetual. But as a perishable perfect man must die, and leave his despotism in the hands of an imperfect successor, an earthly despotism is not merely a bad form of government, it is the worst form that is possible."

-Mark Twain




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users