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Hi, ask me questions about The Garden of Eden


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#1 paygan

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 01:34 PM

Hello there!

My name's Paul and I'm here because I need some help with an important mission to show the world where the real Garden of Eden is after finding it in Rashaya, Lebanon in November 2009.

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The Garden of Eden was a real place, and the centre of the Neolithic Revolution at about 9,500BC. It is located at the heads of the Dan, Banias, Hasbani and Upper Jordan rivers (that's 4 heads, as per the Genesis story AND in the Biblical lands), for more info please visit www.edentourism.com or www.goldenageproject.org.uk.

This conclusion was comprehensively mapped out by Christian O'Brien in his 1985 book, " The Genius of The Few" where he identified it through descriptions given in the earliest Nippur Tablets (The Barton Cylinder, etc), Atrahasis and The Book of Enoch, along with the Bible and The Koran. The Sumerians who were first recorded to have written about it called it "Kharsag".

Eden was located on Google Earth by Edmund Marriage in 2006, who discovered a mile long Great Watercourse in place as per O'Brien's map. I led the field walk recently in an initial survey which has provided the first video (unreleased) and photographic evidence of the site for peer review. Please see these maps for both Google Earth and Christian O'Brien's placement of the remains of structures at this REAL place.

O'Brien identified this site as the starting point of the Neolithic (Agricultural) Revolution at around 9,500BC, soon after the Younger Dryas. Inescapable evidence includes the the development of Jericho soon after this date, along with cultivated figs dug up on the other side of Mount Hermon and cultivated crops starting at Tel Abu Huera, not very far to the North by 9,050BC.

You can also see the ruins of a man-made reservoir, great watercourse and irrigation channels on Google Earth, along with other structures.

The Garden was known as "Kharsag" in the Sumerian Nippur Tablets which means means "head enclosure". The entire Rashaya basin floods every 5-10 years with millions of cubic gallons of water, forming a huge lake that can still be partially seen on Google Earth from the last one in 2005-2006. We found out from the Lebanese Red Cross that they had put dye down a sinkhole in the Garden that drains the entire basin. The dye came out in the Hasbani. After seeing all this, I now strongly suspect that the people who built Kharsag's reservoir, dam and watercourse did so to control the Lebanese and Anti-Lebanese mountain run off waters and direct them out into the lowlands of "Eden", the area around and likely to the South of Kharsag, which links into the Jordan river and associated famous valley possibly onward to Jericho, etc.

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The four headwaters I place as the Dan, Banias, Hasbani and Upper Jordan River rising out of the area around Eden / Kharsag and flowing into the Jordan. The final shape of the Book of Genesis is generally regarded to have taken place around 5-600 B.C. and most of the names have been changed from the actual places and people the stories are about. Mount Hermon for instance is recorded to have been known as Mount Sion in Deuteronomy 4:48. A name presumably somewhat pilfered by King David for Jerusalem's Mount Zion. The Rashaya Basin is 8 miles North of Mount Hermon, 25 miles East of Damascus.

The centre of cultural diffusion at the time was the Garden, Kharsag, a bounded area in the mountains, sending out water and knowledge to the grassland/steppe area around, known as Eden.

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The theories about Eden being a central site of the agricultural revolution between the Tigris and Euphrates are disproven archaeologically as there would have been ice-flows in this area as agriculture started in the North Western bend of the fertile crescent, not the South East... and that Sumerian civilization didn't move to Eridu, their first city until around 5,500BC.

I'm looking to promote Eden, as I can see the benefits of archaeology catching up with religion and showing it's source as scientifically as possible. It's a search for human origins and the starting point of the agricultural revolution which is currently best guessed at by Colin Renfrew's "Anatolian Hypothesis", which anyone knowledgeable on finds at Jericho, Tel Abu-Huera and around Mount Hermon may well speculate misses the facts by being a few hundred kilometres too North and a few hundred years too late.

I've spent a lot of last year working on Wikipedia, figuring out where I stand academically on this. It's been a fierce battle with hardcore sceptics, armed with little peer reviewed material as ammunition. It has resulted in the creation of pages (often after massive heated debates you can read about in the discussions) on Kharsag, Christian O'Brien, George Aaron Barton and The Barton Cylinder - mankind's oldest written story, supposedly pre-dating even the Pyramid Texts.

There are various accounts of the Garden of Eden outside the Bible, including the Koran. Eden itself comes from the Sumerian word "Edin" meaning "plain" or "steppe".

The Nippur Tablets, including the Barton Cylinder are most important source documents describing the location of the Garden of Eden, and it's inhabitants, the first Sumerian Pantheon (An, Ninkharsag, Enlil & Enki). These were dug up in the foundations of the temple and library at Nippur by John Henry Haynes in 1898 and translated by George Aaron Barton. These are the oldest religious/story texts in the world, pre-dating the pyramid texts by at least half a century.

Another is the Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 produced around the 2nd century BC from materials with a much older tradition, discovered by Canon Charles and translated by his friend Dr Morfill, the Professor of Slavonic Studies at Oxford. It is from Morfill's work that we have the clearest accounts of the Garden of Eden.

Also we have an Akkadian work, Atra-hasis, Tablet 1 which was copied by a scribe called Ku-aya, in the reign of Ammi-saduqa about 1635 B.C., from non-existant, earlier material. It is indicated that Ku-aya translated an earlier Sumerian tablet into Akkadian. Translations of the Akkadian text have been made by Lambert and Millard, two Oxford scholars following in the footsteps of Canon Charles.

Atra-hasis tells the story of a rebellion of the workers building the Great Watercourse in The Garden of Eden and of them surrounding Enlil's Great House in a mob with tools raised. It then tells the story of the Annunaki council creating "salaried man" and causing a massive rift in our development from utalitarian to capitalist objectives as a race.

From this we get various legends of "fallen angels".

The starting point of the agricultural revolution is thought by many to be 'Eden', which is currently best guessed at by Colin Renfrew's "Anatolian Hypothesis", which anyone knowledgeable on finds at Jericho, Tel Abu-Huera and around Mount Hermon may well speculate misses the facts by being a few hundred kilometres too North and a few hundred years too late.

Inescapable evidence that Anatolia being a bit too North include the the development of agriculture at Jericho before this, cultivated crops are also found starting at Tel Abu Huera, not very far to the North by 9,050BC. Cicer arietinum L. (chickpea) and Vicia faba L. (faba bean, broad bean or horse bean) were found in late 10th millennium b.p. levels at Tell el-Kerkh. Cultivated figs were also dug up on the other side of Mount Hermon at Ohalo II, dated to 9,500-9,300 by Kislev et al not far from Kharsag / Eden.

Sir Colin Renfrew's Anatolian Hypothesis is the currently most widely accepted among academics. This dates the start of the agricultural revolution to c. 7,000 B.C.

My biggest problem with the Northern Theory, is Dame Kathleen Kenyon's excavations of Jericho, which shows organised agriculture long before that date to the South of both Anatolia (Turkey) and Lebanon :

Kathleen Kenyon's conclusions
Kenyon's excavations demonstrated that Jericho was originally founded by sedentary foragers/collectors in the Natufian Period (12,800–10,500 b.p.), living in large semisubterranean oval stone structures, although it is unclear how extensive this occupation was. With the introduction of domesticated plants in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A period (PPNA) (ca. 10,500/10,300–9300 b.p.), Jericho mushroomed into a large regional agricultural community covering an area of some 300 square yards (25,000 sq m). Villagers, like those of the nearby sites of Netiv Hagdud and Gilgal I, lived year-round in roofed, oval semisubterranean dwellings.

Read more: Jericho - Digging Up Jericho, The Neolithic of the Near East - Neolithic, Bronze, Age, Kenyon, Excavations, and Period


Pictured below is the ruin of a similar, oval, semisubterranean dwelling we found in the Rashaya basin (Eden / Kharsag) with a limestone plaster floor typical of other Neolithic finds dating to the time in question around this area:

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Also of interesst at Jericho is the 600 metre x 9 metre x 3 metre rock cut ditch radio-carbon dated to a re-calibrated date c. 8,800 - 9,000 B.C.

The Great Watercourse in Eden looks to have been approximately the same specification - 9 metres deep by 3 metres wide and extends over a mile, the sinkhole section is pictured below. I have added another image, as if you look carefully, you can see a rock cut bridge extending over this section, with a groove alligned to Mount Hermon, from which I speculate hung a giant Cedar sluice (water control) gate.

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What you can do to help? Well, click on the links, do some reading and if you're interested and support the promotion of this knowledge, spread it around other web-boards, friends and family. The Golden Age Project has some fascinating stuff on it, which you might have to wade through to find, but it's all in there somewhere and the site is looking a lot better than it did 18 months back. "The Genius of The Few" is probably the best book with the best info about O'Brien's location of Eden in Rashaya if you can't be bothered trawling the website for it and want a nice collectors edition.

If anyone can assist to get a review of the above book into a major newspaper or peer reviewed journal - positive or negative - I can then go walkabout on Wikipedia again with a really big gun against the sceptics. If anyone wants the most amazing topic for a thesis, I cannot think of anything bigger than this. ;-)

Also, if anyone wants to help with funding for pollen core analysis and geo-phys surveys surveys is required, along with further peer reviewable material and the attention of UNESCO and the Lebanese Ministry of Culture.

More on that to come in my posts. Let me know if you have any questions as I claim to be the knowledgeable about this Eden / Kharsag site.

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Further explanation in slide format

My Blog
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#2 FYI

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 01:38 PM

Do you think a single poster on this site will read that entire post?
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#3 GoodEats!

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 02:27 PM

:pardon: i kinda did.

#4 Pinchas

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 03:05 PM

Me too. Fascinating. I always thought Eden was more in the Persian area (modern day Iran).

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#5 Nechama

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 03:20 PM

I think I saw something on the National Geographic Channel about this.
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#6 paygan

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 06:13 PM

I'd add that it's pretty important for Jewish history cos your culture and ancestors from this area all did something amazing for our race here, even before Abraham was around.

Sadly, I applied for National Geographic funding but they turned me down. The science is all pointing this way, so I am doubtless their articles must be getting close.
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#7 DaKaD

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 12:54 PM

Reminds me of the old joke about the professor who flunked his student and wrote on his paper: "If you'd only written three pages of this junk, I'd have given you a C but because you wrote 50 I had to give you an F."

Am I the only one who smells an agenda here considering the poster's screen name?
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#8 paygan

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 09:26 PM

Paygan is an old way of spelling pagan, merged during the reformation from various spellings. It used to mean 'peaceful country person' and I assure you that's the agenda I bring to the table here.

UNESCO World Heritage Status for this site is my aim, along with most others affiliated with the Kharsag Research Project.

So for those fans of 50 word posts with pictures, I would have a video, but have been prevented, here's my best:

Please find some more pictures of the site of prime archaeological importance that is in danger of being built on.

Here's the roadway up to the Great House of Eden area that's in danger of getting built on (the new house already going up there, is one of several under construction around the site).

Any ideas how to protect and save it welcome!

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Along with flood damage, extensive water erosion is shown on the best surviving limestone parts of the Great Watercourse indicating thousands of years of water-flow.

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Many sections have been bulldozed entirely to make way for orchards. The mound in the centre of the photo is one of the best surviving parts to the West leading to the Sinkhole.

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Some sections are in slightly better condition leading back to the village of Kfar Qooq. All surviving sections are clearly visible on Google Earth.

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Inside the ditch sections is full of rubble and rubbish, with few parts of the original walls in place exposed and most covered in feet of earth.

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"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#9 paygan

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 03:27 PM

It has been noted that my topic may be straying from the Jewish focus of the content of this forum, so I thought I'd raise the point that Eden is the founding location of the Jewish Faith.

I would therefore be very interesting in people's opinions in this regard.

I don't suppose it will ever carry the pilgrimage power of Mecca for the Muslims, especially due to the location 'over the border' in Lebanon, but "The Garden" is mentioned in both Koran, Torah and Old Testament and hence I dream of an eco-archaeological park here oneday that might be a powerful tool for peace in the Middle East.

Whatever happens to the site, it makes a nice dream. :-)
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#10 GoodEats!

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 03:50 PM

those pix dont look very eden-y though.

#11 warren

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 04:15 PM

It has been noted that my topic may be straying from the Jewish focus of the content of this forum, so I thought I'd raise the point that Eden is the founding location of the Jewish Faith.

No, it is not. Adam and Eve were not Jews.
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#12 paygan

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 10:02 AM

those pix dont look very eden-y though.


It's not. We didn't do a very good job of looking after it.


No, it is not. Adam and Eve were not Jews.


They were the ancestors of Abraham, if you consider him the first Jew. In a sense, Adam and Eve were proto-Jews.
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#13 warren

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 10:24 AM

They were the ancestors of Abraham, if you consider him the first Jew. In a sense, Adam and Eve were proto-Jews.

According to the Bible, they were the ancestors of everyone. So in no sense are they more the forerunners of Jews than of anyone else.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"

#14 LumpyPostage

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 11:36 AM

The Garden of Eden is in Kenya. I had an incredible salad there once.
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#15 paygan

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 01:31 PM

The salad's from country near Mount Hermon are amazing too.

All the Druze food is lush there. Me and Karl ended up calling it "Eden-food" before long.
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#16 paganyid

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:51 PM

GIVE ME MONEY! TAKE MY TOUR! WE'LL NAME ANIMALS! SNAKES WILL TALK! BRING YOUR FLAMING SWORD!
There's only room for one pagan around here, chief...

#17 paygan

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 09:22 PM

GIVE ME MONEY! TAKE MY TOUR! WE'LL NAME ANIMALS! SNAKES WILL TALK! BRING YOUR FLAMING SWORD!
There's only room for one pagan around here, chief...


Hey! Pagans used to work as a community you know. :drinks:

And I can do a much better tour guide commentary...

I like to imagine the time when that watercourse was flowing, the two great houses of life and knowledge were shining silver in the moonlight. Camp fires from the workers houses were dotted all around the slopes into the valley. People settling down for the first time and learning to cultivate plants and organise our race. When the ruins of the large irrigation system and dam we found were operational, it must have made it very lush and green back then with likely far more trees.

These would have been both of our ancestors too perhaps!
"And there were in all two hundred who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon..." - Slavonic Book of Enoch 2 VI:6 VB

#18 yoel

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 12:48 PM

Although I want to stress that what the OP is saying is totally irrelevant to anything, Adam and Chava were definitely Jews in a spiritual sense.
וזה עקר צער של ישראל שיש להם בגלות
הכל הוא מחמת שנפלו מהדעת ותולין
הכל בטבע ובמקרים ובמזל

רבי נחמן מברסלב

#19 israeli4ever

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 11:43 AM

It has been noted that my topic may be straying from the Jewish focus of the content of this forum, so I thought I'd raise the point that Eden is the founding location of the Jewish Faith.

I would therefore be very interesting in people's opinions in this regard.

I don't suppose it will ever carry the pilgrimage power of Mecca for the Muslims, especially due to the location 'over the border' in Lebanon, but "The Garden" is mentioned in both Koran, Torah and Old Testament and hence I dream of an eco-archaeological park here oneday that might be a powerful tool for peace in the Middle East.

Whatever happens to the site, it makes a nice dream. :-)

For the founding of the Jewish People, i would give 3 possible location, Land of Canaan, Mitzrayim, or Mt Sinai.....

What exactly happens so bad if they build up what looks like a dead valley? although it would be fascinating to be able to see where Gan Eden is / was, i dont see why effort should be made to protect it, from a religious point of view.



Disclaimer: The comments made by this poster do not necessarily represent an actual opinion, they are merely the latest output of an infinite amount of monkeys working on Shakespeare
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#20 LumpyPostage

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Posted 23 February 2011 - 06:36 AM

GIVE ME MONEY! TAKE MY TOUR! WE'LL NAME ANIMALS! SNAKES WILL TALK! BRING YOUR FLAMING SWORD!
There's only room for one pagan around here, chief...

I so want a lightsaber.

The salad's from country near Mount Hermon are amazing too.

I had a go but I simply cannot decode this sentence.
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