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America's Most Miserable Cities, 2011


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#1 Tel Aviv

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 09:45 PM

America's Most Miserable Cities, 2011

Kurt Badenhausen, Forbes.com Feb 2, 2011

Arnold Schwarzenegger was sworn in as the governor of California at the end of 2003 amid a wave of optimism that his independent thinking and fresh ideas would revive a state stumbling after the recall of Gov. Gray Davis.

The good vibes are a distant memory: The Governator exited office last month with the state facing a crippling checklist of problems including massive budget deficits, high unemployment, plunging home prices, rampant crime and sky-high taxes. Schwarzenegger's approval ratings hit 22% last year, a record low for any sitting California governor.

[ . . . ]

Full text at http://realestate.ya...ities-2011.html
Sometimes I wonder why some elites work so hard in an unethical manner to gain wealth and power: they can't take any of their wealth and power with them when they die. Philosophically looking at it, if there is a G-d, they will have an eternity of suffering to pay for their crimes against humanity. And if there is no G-d, then once they die, they will have no memories and conscious awareness of their success in life because their consciousness and memories are lost for eternity, becoming nothing more than dirt in the ground. So, these elites in the end lose either way. The 100 years of life living like a king is just a drop of water in the infinite ocean of time that they will experience suffering at the hands of G-d, or not experience in a state of non-existence.

#2 radioreuven

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 03:58 PM

Rampant crime? where? most police agencies in California are reporting record low crime rates including the LAPD. The budget deficits, high unemployment and high taxes are due to the incompetent state and federal government not necessarily his policies. Not saying he was a good or great governor but lets get the facts straight. The problem is that these politicians can't agree on anything and are only in it for the perks and money.

America's Most Miserable Cities, 2011

Kurt Badenhausen, Forbes.com Feb 2, 2011

Arnold Schwarzenegger was sworn in as the governor of California at the end of 2003 amid a wave of optimism that his independent thinking and fresh ideas would revive a state stumbling after the recall of Gov. Gray Davis.

The good vibes are a distant memory: The Governator exited office last month with the state facing a crippling checklist of problems including massive budget deficits, high unemployment, plunging home prices, rampant crime and sky-high taxes. Schwarzenegger's approval ratings hit 22% last year, a record low for any sitting California governor.

[ . . . ]

Full text at http://realestate.ya...ities-2011.html


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#3 Jeanette

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 10:20 PM

Why are almost all the cities in California and Florida? This whole list is suspect to me. I think the formula puts too much weight on how great was the housing bubble that burst--so cities that had overpriced housing to begin with end up high on the list even though they're not actually such bad places.

#4 Tel Aviv

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 02:41 PM

http://images.busine...st_cities/2.htm

Best Cities to Work and Live: New York
Rank: 1
Workers who would like to move there: 11%
Median household income: $48,631
Median home value: $584,761
Annual home price change: -2.18%

New York, one of the world's great cities, is home to Wall Street, the Broadway theatre district, and many of the best bars, art movie houses, and restaurants in the world. The city's largest employers include New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System, and financial companies such as Citigroup and J.P. Morgan Chase. Top attributes include entertainment options, professional/personal opportunities, and ease of transportation. Entertainment was cited by 51% of respondents.


Best Cities to Work and Live: San Diego
Rank: 2
Workers who would like to move there: 11%
Median household income: $61,863
Median home value: $393,029
Annual home price change: -14.7%

San Diego, California's second-largest city, has 70 miles of beaches, a world-famous zoo, major scientific research institutions, and numerous military installations. The largest employers include the military, the state and federal government, the Sharp Healthcare hospitals, the University of California at San Diego, and major companies such as AT&T. Workers said the city's best attributes were its environment (climate, parks, natural features, etc.), its image, and entertainment options. The environment was cited by 77% of workers.


Best Cities to Work and Live: San Francisco
Rank: 3
Workers who would like to move there: 9%
Median household income: $68,023
Median home value: $766,985
Annual home price change: -5.5%

San Francisco is one of the most beautiful cities in the world (it's also one of the most expensive). It's a progressive city with a vibrant economy, a vibrant arts and cultural scene, and a busy seaport. The University of California, San Francisco is one of the nation's top medical colleges. The city has become a biotech and technology center like neighboring Silicon Valley. The city's top attributes, according to the survey, were the environment (climate, parks, natural features, etc.), entertainment options, residents' background, talents and perspectives, and professional/personal opportunities.


Sometimes I wonder why some elites work so hard in an unethical manner to gain wealth and power: they can't take any of their wealth and power with them when they die. Philosophically looking at it, if there is a G-d, they will have an eternity of suffering to pay for their crimes against humanity. And if there is no G-d, then once they die, they will have no memories and conscious awareness of their success in life because their consciousness and memories are lost for eternity, becoming nothing more than dirt in the ground. So, these elites in the end lose either way. The 100 years of life living like a king is just a drop of water in the infinite ocean of time that they will experience suffering at the hands of G-d, or not experience in a state of non-existence.

#5 33948

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 12:05 PM

They aren't miserable if you have money or a social security check but they are miserable because the economy and unemployment is really bad. I'm in south florida right now. Typically the economy here is about 50% tourism and 50% construction. The construction industry is dead. All those people are out of work driving up unemployment.

Further most of the housing is new. People bought it all during the bubble, thus lost their houses. So now people are homeless (typically move in with relatives) and out of work. This affects not only construction but every other low skilled industry as well as education, because now construction workers are applying to work at McDonalds (or anywhere else).

This also leads to lowered sales at businesses. It's a death spiral.

However if you deduct the economic factors (such as you don't own a business, don't own real estate or don't work in a low skill job) then yes its a great place to live. Same story in California and Nevada. Florida, Cali and Nevada have the highest unemployment in the country as well as the highest rate of foreclosures.

#6 Bet Chesed

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 01:12 PM

This list seems weird to me. I would think that a number of Michigan cities (Saginaw for instance) would be on that list. I wonder what criteria were used. I'm guessing this is only 100k+ or something like that.
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#7 33948

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 10:09 AM

Reading their list they constantly cite taxes. It seems that taxes (sales and income) are some of the biggest factors in their calculations. Yet I think that is a little bit stupid. All the nicest places to live always have higher taxes and more regulations.

I think decline in home value is a major factor as well. So if you had a $1,000,000 home in Chicago and now it's worth $500,000 that's a 50% decline. But if you lived in a $20,000 dump in Detroit and today its worth $19,000 that's only a 20% decline. Even though in reality the mansion is still a less miserable place. It's forbes- the main focus is on financial growth, though I guess they do factor a little bit in for crime and weather.

They actually list mostly the wealthiest places in the United States.

For example I have been to the Washington DC area. I love that area, I hardly would call it one of the most miserable places to live. Yeah the traffick is bad but so what. The suburbs there are some of the wealthiest in the nation and its a very nice city except for the ghetto south side. They also have a lot of very high paying jobs in that area. South Florida is also a relatively nice place to live etc. This seems like a list of the best places to live in my opinion, with the exception of Chicago lol

But I think that is the point. The nicest places are hit the worst. If you live in a corn field in Nebraska you haven't really seen any effects from the bad economy. If you live in some dump city it was always a dump so not much of a differance. Whereas in places like south florida we have massive budget cuts because normally the place is booming and now everything is closing up shop. I would guess its similar in those other places as well.




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