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Judaism and Spirits of Evil


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#21 israeli4ever

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 10:46 AM

....
There is no singular Orthodox belief regarding "evil spirits." You will find sages who believe they exist in a literal sense, and treat them in a manner similar to djinn in Islam (excepting that I have yet to come across anything what would parallel Sammael with Iblis). On the other hand, sages such as R. Se'adia Gaon and Maimonides do not believe that said beings have a literal existence (and I believe they hold the same view with regards to angels as well).

Much as there is no singular Jewish (orthodox) belief in any other idea....

yes, RSG and RaMBaM did not accept the idea of angels and spirits as actual beings. However, the GR"A fro example did, as did many (most) others, particularly Kabbalists.





I cant find the source in text for the Chaftz Chaims Dybbuk right now, but i did see quoted from Lev Eliyahu (R Elya Lopian) on Sefer Bereishit, pp. 28-31 a rather interesting (for a whole host of reasons) story about a different Dybbuk, and all the names are recorded, and reliable. I saw it on this blog, and plan on reading the Lev Eliyahu inside when i get a chance.


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#22 warren

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:21 PM

I cant find the source in text for the Chaftz Chaims Dybbuk right now, but i did see quoted from Lev Eliyahu (R Elya Lopian) on Sefer Bereishit, pp. 28-31 a rather interesting (for a whole host of reasons) story about a different Dybbuk, and all the names are recorded, and reliable. I saw it on this blog, and plan on reading the Lev Eliyahu inside when i get a chance.

The names are reliable? The blog is? The sefer?
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#23 israeli4ever

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:28 PM

The names are reliable? The blog is? The sefer?

The names and the sefer. The blog says where in the sefer to find it...
Disclaimer: The comments made by this poster do not necessarily represent an actual opinion, they are merely the latest output of an infinite amount of monkeys working on Shakespeare
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#24 darkgreenjeans

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:27 PM

best not to focus on the bad, judaism, i think is more mature in being more accepting of the fact that, rather than good and bad spirits, spirits have both sides to them, ultimately the good being moreso, because good is whole, while evil is fragmented and seeks wholeness. Good moreso just represents balance, and evil represents unbalance, which is in the long run impossible to sustain, which is why evil cannot win.

#25 darkgreenjeans

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:28 PM

best not to focus on the bad, judaism, i think is more mature in being more accepting of the fact that, rather than good and bad spirits, spirits have both sides to them, ultimately the good being moreso, because good is whole, while evil is fragmented and seeks wholeness. Good moreso just represents balance, and evil represents unbalance, which is in the long run impossible to sustain, which is why evil cannot win.

when we invoke an angel, I believe we will always encounter some evil, but overall, it will be the greater good,
because we came from the whole path, so we are not caught in the fragment

i believe those who invoke demons, encounter the same force, and walk the same circle, and will encounter some good, but overall, it will be bad, unless they change their intent for good, because the demon is not strong enough to see beyond the fragment,

these are the same being, but they can see in our heart, in a way it is not that, but the doing of our own heart which causes the reaction, not that they judge us but the energy in our heart will move them a certain way, like a magnet either celestial, making whole, or demonic, fragmenting,

ultimately, also, i believe we all begin on the celestial path and it all ends there, we all begin with the wish for good, and the vision of wholeness, and in eternity, it can't be lost, moment to moment, we may not remember fully, in the small view it may seem evil eclipses good, but this is never the case in reality, simply because of what Good is, its kind of hard to understand, and easy at the same time.

but like a magnet again, the way the 'movements' happen, overall it always works out for good, thats just the way energy is and the universe. Its just more direct to invoke the Angel, something you do because you feel in your heart, so while logically it may be equal, in practice, people usually dont call on angel + demon, because even though its kind of a system, its not just like math, it has more to do with feelings. While, it will always end up good in the overall picture, you dont call the bad one, you don't test it, because bad things do happen, in the moment to moment, and it can be a lot, but if it happens, if someone else does it around you, you know itll be okay, for instance. Thats the way I approach it at least.

#26 ijs

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:54 PM

Obviously, Judaism does not place Satan on such a pedestal as Christianity.


In fact, they are not the same being at all. In Xianity, Satan is a "fallen" angel who rebelled against G-d. In Judaism, HaSatan is an angel that only does HaShem's will; since angels, unlike humans, have no free will, rebellion against HaShem by an angel is nonsensical.

Xianity perceives Satan as the evil being that challenges G-d for supremacy over the universe (though he must lose, by definition), and thus the "pedestal," as you put it. This makes no sense to Judaism, and so that being is of relatively minor importance.

In the morning every Jew prays to not let the evil inclination (which is called Satan in some sources) dominate us.


Our siddur uses "evil inclination," and therein it occurs at the end of the Shemoneh Esrei at all three prayer times.
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#27 asoul

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 03:33 AM

"Shedim is the Hebrew word for demons. The word shedim appears only twice (always plural) in the Tanakh, at Psalm 106:37 and Deuteronomy 32:17. It was possibly a loan-word from Akkadian in which the word sedu referred to a protective, benevolent spirit. Both times the term appears in the Tanakh, it deals with child or animal sacrifice to false gods that are called demons."

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shedim)



#28 asoul

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 03:58 AM

" Rabbinical demonology has, like the Chaldean, three classes of, demons, though they are scarcely separable one from another. There were the "shedim," the "mazziḳim" (harmers), and the "ruḥin" or "ruḥotra'ot" (evil spirits). Besides these there were "lilin" (night spirits), "ṭelane" (shade, or evening, spirits), "ṭiharire" (midday spirits), and "ẓafrire" (morning spirits), as well as the "demons that bring famine" and "such as cause storm and earthquake" (Targ. Yer. to Deut. xxxii. 24 and Num. vi. 24; Targ. to Cant. iii. 8, iv. 6; Eccl. ii. 5; Ps. xci. 5, 6; compare Ps. lxx. and Is. xxxiv. 14). Occasionally they are called "mal'ake ḥabbalah" (angels of destruction) (Ber. 51a; Ket. 104a; Sanh. 106b). "They surround man on all sides as the earth does the roots of the vine"; "a thousand are on his left, and ten thousand on his right side" (compare Ps. xci. 7); if a man could see them he would lack the strength to face them, though he can see them by casting the ashes of the fetus of a black cat about his eyes, or by sprinkling ashes around his bed he can trace their ######-like footprints in the morning (Ber. 6a). They hover around the house and the field (Gen. R. xx.), particularly in the lower regions of the air (Num. R. xii.; Tan., Mishpaṭim, ed. Vienna, 99a; compare Diogenes Laertius, viii. 32, ix. 7). Their main abode is in the northern part of the earth (Pirḳe R. El. iii., after Jer. i. 14). Their sporting-places are caper-bushes and spearworts, where they dwell in groups of sixty; nut-trees, where they form in groups of nine; shady spots on moonlight nights, especially the roofs of houses, under gutters, or near ruins; cemeteries and privies (there is a special demon of the privy, "shed shel bet ha-kisse"); water, oil, and bread-crums cast on the ground; and they harm persons and things coming near them."

http://www.jewishenc...5085-demonology




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