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What to bring when making Aliyah


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#1 radioreuven

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 03:42 PM

What is worth bringing? What is worth buying in Israel?

oak books shelves?

nice leather couches?

small kitchen appliances such as microwave, toaster oven?

Pal capable tvs?

dvd players?

wireless internet router?

cordless DECT phone?

beds?

silverware?

dressers?
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#2 rachel b.

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 08:28 PM

I'm too embarrassed to post this on the NBN list, but would lollipops survive on our lift? I'm debating buying the 5 lb bag of organic lollipops to take, and I've been stocking up on newly kosher Tootsie Pops. Would they melt or otherwise be inedible when they arrived?

#3 starwolf

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 12:44 AM

What is worth bringing? What is worth buying in Israel?

oak books shelves?

nice leather couches?

small kitchen appliances such as microwave, toaster oven?

Pal capable tvs?

dvd players?

wireless internet router?

cordless DECT phone?

beds?

silverware?

dressers?


the answer to this question is....it all depends.

In a lift, you pay for volume, so it is worth it to stuff it to bursting, and you can fit a lot of stuff in a shipping container. Bring any furniture with sentimental value, etc.

If you are moving into your own apartment, then you know what the measurements are, and you can plan for furniture needs directly. If you don't yet have your own place, it is best to remain flexible.

Most people end up with smaller homes in Israel, and most places have limited to no storage space. Israeli furniture tends to try to optimize space. For example, trundle beds and bunk beds for kids. Also, there are many Israeli dining room tables that have ingenious expansion features that do not involve extensive effort to put in the extra leaves. Some of them also store the leaves under the table. this is a much more convenient method than the ones that we are accustomed to in the US. but of course, if you have that beautiful cherrywood table from the US--well, it might be difficult to find the equivalent here.

If you are in love with your hardwood furniture, bring it--it is very expensive in Israel. This includes bookshelves.

Leather couches may be to your taste (and to mine) but most people don't find them too practical. Keep in mind that most apartments will not be heated as much as in the US, so in the winter, you may freeze your arse off (before it warms up). In the summer....stickiness. however, again--if you have that beautiful one that you really love and there is room for it......

Electronics.
If you know that things are compatible with Israeli standards, bring them. They are much more expensive here. You are limited in what you can bring.

I'm too embarrassed to post this on the NBN list, but would lollipops survive on our lift? I'm debating buying the 5 lb bag of organic lollipops to take, and I've been stocking up on newly kosher Tootsie Pops. Would they melt or otherwise be inedible when they arrived?


We sent some foodstuffs, and they were all just fine. this included fancy French chocolate, which did not melt.

The only issue that you might have is freshness, and I doubt that it would be an issue with those items.

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#4 Pinchas

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 02:49 AM

BTW, Organic Lollipops ARE available in Israel.
(I know for sure that Nitzat Hadudavin sp? sells them.)

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#5 rachel b.

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 11:30 AM

P, I know they are available in Israel, but they're so cheap on Amazon, and we won't have a car at first, and I don't know what's available in RBS, and "lollipots" really make my daughter happy and I want to keep everyone happy during all this tumult. Also we have extra space on our lift.

Really, your chocolate didn't melt? Did you go in the summer?

#6 happyduck1979

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 02:10 PM

1) We just got a car in RBS and can certainly give you a bit of a hand if you need.
2) Agree on the real wood furniture. Way more expensive here.
3) English reading. English books here can be a fortune. I run a book swap 4 times a year so I spend almost nothing on books, but they can be 80 shek a pop!
4) Toys. They are either cheap crud or insanely expensive awesome quality. There is no middle ground.
5) A good, waterproof, winter coat. Israeli's don't know what they are.
6) Ziplock bags, cotton balls and q tips. All stupidly expensive here.
7) Bras. There is tons of selection here but most of them barely survive a single hand wash.
8) transferable elecronics. They tend to be more expensive here.

I am sure I have more but that is all I got off the top.
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#7 starwolf

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 10:37 PM

To expand on happyduck's post, if you have any cosmetics, soaps or shampoos that you are partial to, send them. they may or may not be available here, but if they are, they will cost much more. that's why you see Israelis in CVS when in the US. If you have room in the lift, stock up. These are some of the things with the greatest price diffentials.

Children's clothing:
Reasonable quality here is expensive. There is no equivalent of the outlet malls or Target. You can find cheap clothing in places, but it will probably not last more than a season, so if you plan on handing it down, fuggedaboudit.

You can buy a couple of seasons worth of clothes in advance. winter coats are a very good idea. Unless you live in Jerusalem/the Gush/hev4ron/Schem/golan areas, you won't want the warmest things- medium-heavy with a waterproof outer layer is the best.

In most communities in Israel, formal clothing is not much used. So for children's holiday clothing, you might want something one step down from the formal dresses your daughters might have worn to shul in the US if you don't want them to really stand out. Of course, if you are hareidi this may not apply, as I don't know much about the way they dress their children.

Good-quality school backpacks for children are also a good idea.

If there is a particular nonperishable food that you cannot do without, you should ship a supply. Some products are not available here, others are more expensive. Feel free to ask on the forums.

For example, single malt whisky is insanely expensive here, and only limited types are available. However, legally if you put this stuff in your lift, you must declare it, and you will be charged customs.




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doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#8 happyduck1979

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 01:27 AM

Just curious about why you recommend bringing soap/shampoo. North American stuff does not really lather here as well. I have generally recommended against bringing that sort of stuff (although I totally agree for cosmetics).
"Don't listen to people who try to defend what God has done to you. God is a big boy. He can take care of himself. You take care of you"-unknown comforting visitor after we lost Gabbi

Empty Cradle, Empty Heart My thoughts, rants against God, and prayers after have a still birth of a very wanted little girl in February of 2011.
Why I choose to put private information in a public location

Our Aliya Blog Lots of pictures.
Yes, still another blog. This one is about quick kosher cooking and is more like my personal recipe box
Coming soon. A blog to keep track of my other blogs.

New Site. New Stuff. New Sales. Swirsky Designs

#9 starwolf

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 04:42 AM

Just curious about why you recommend bringing soap/shampoo. North American stuff does not really lather here as well. I have generally recommended against bringing that sort of stuff (although I totally agree for cosmetics).


I know that there are products not easily available here, such as hypoallergenic stuff.

As far as the degree of lathering of products, I will defer to you, as I don't pay that close attention to those things.

But I would imagine that it depend on the mineral quality of the water. which will vary according to where you live.

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#10 NY-LON

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:20 PM

Lather is pretty much cosmetic, anyway--I use shampoo that doesn't produce a lather at all because it doesn't have sulfate detergents in it. The lather problem will exist anywhere that has hard water, and it can sometimes be easier to rinse clean in hard water. Some people do find that hard water affects their hair badly and they need to change shampoos, but there are parts of North America with very hard water too.

(Laundry detergent is another matter; hard water matters much more for that.)
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#11 rachel b.

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 07:57 PM

OK, I'll post pics of us all looking like Kramer when he lost water pressure!




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