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#21 lyric

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 09:30 AM

If my back is very painful, walking makes me feel like the little mermaid; every step is like walking on knives.

At the moment I am doing a balancing act between not wanting to get addicted to the codeine in co-codamol, and wanting pain relief. My osteopath suggested I wean myself off the co-codamol (I was on the 30/500 dose and I took two at a time) so now I take one 15/500 but it doesn't afford nearly the same relief. I also take diclofenac and tramadol. I don't want to, but I can't bear the pain. I need to be able to function.
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#22 starwolf

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 05:16 PM

If my back is very painful, walking makes me feel like the little mermaid; every step is like walking on knives.

At the moment I am doing a balancing act between not wanting to get addicted to the codeine in co-codamol, and wanting pain relief. My osteopath suggested I wean myself off the co-codamol (I was on the 30/500 dose and I took two at a time) so now I take one 15/500 but it doesn't afford nearly the same relief. I also take diclofenac and tramadol. I don't want to, but I can't bear the pain. I need to be able to function.


Watch those opiates, Lyric. Your bowels also need to be able to function, if you will pardon the indelicacy.

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


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#23 comfortingsong

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 05:49 PM

If my back is very painful, walking makes me feel like the little mermaid; every step is like walking on knives.

And I thought your avatar was an accurate reflection of how daintily you skip! :wink2:

#24 starwolf

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 06:01 PM

And I thought your avatar was an accurate reflection of how daintily you skip! :wink2:


Or that you don't believe in mixed dancing...........Posted Image

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#25 lyric

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 07:23 PM

Watch those opiates, Lyric. Your bowels also need to be able to function, if you will pardon the indelicacy.


I am aware they can cause constipation, and I take other stuff to counteract that side effect.

And I thought your avatar was an accurate reflection of how daintily you skip! :wink2:


How daintily I'd like to be able to skip :lol:
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#26 justajew

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 07:53 AM

If my back is very painful, walking makes me feel like the little mermaid; every step is like walking on knives.

At the moment I am doing a balancing act between not wanting to get addicted to the codeine in co-codamol, and wanting pain relief. My osteopath suggested I wean myself off the co-codamol (I was on the 30/500 dose and I took two at a time) so now I take one 15/500 but it doesn't afford nearly the same relief. I also take diclofenac and tramadol. I don't want to, but I can't bear the pain. I need to be able to function.

I found tramadol to be completely useless for my back.
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#27 mosheshmeal

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 07:59 AM

I would love to see a chiropractor, sponsors welcome!

see a chiropractor... see a chiropractor... see a chiropractor... see a chiropractor... see a chiropractor...

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#28 starwolf

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:06 AM

Tramadol is a moderate-strength opiate, and if you have severe pain and high tolerance, I would not expect it to do you too much good.

Again, the efficacy of various drugs and other treatments will depend on the cause of the problem. If the cause is muscular, for example, a muscle relaxant will be of help. If the cause is pinching of the nerves by the bones in the spinal cord, a muscle relaxant will not be of much help.

The same thing hold for physical activities. In some cases, sitting still will be the most painful thing, and walking relieve the pain. However, if the problem is damage to cartilage, movement will probably be more painful.

That is why identification of the problem is extremely important, and should be done by a doctor. Just because someone feels pain in a certain part of the body, that does not mean that the source of the pain is in the locale that it is "felt". The classic example of this is the pain in the upper arm that is characteristic of heart attacks.

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#29 TheDuncePolice

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:34 PM

.
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#30 lyric

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:42 PM

What book is that?

Why isn't my avatar animated any more? It is on my hard drive.
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#31 Bet Chesed

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:57 PM

Has anyone here had severe back pain which led them to see a physical therapist? If so, what kind of therapies did you engage in and did you find it helpful? What other pain remedies did you turn to and did they help you as well?


Massage, chiropractor, acupuncture are all used by friends of mine. Once your back is no longer hurting I would start doing yoga.
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#32 TheDuncePolice

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 09:43 PM

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#33 smishu

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 11:31 PM

If my back is very painful, walking makes me feel like the little mermaid; every step is like walking on knives.

At the moment I am doing a balancing act between not wanting to get addicted to the codeine in co-codamol, and wanting pain relief. My osteopath suggested I wean myself off the co-codamol (I was on the 30/500 dose and I took two at a time) so now I take one 15/500 but it doesn't afford nearly the same relief. I also take diclofenac and tramadol. I don't want to, but I can't bear the pain. I need to be able to function.



Lyric, is it hard to get physical therapy in england? It sounds like you can greatly benefit from it. Too many cortisone shots actually have a side effect of weakening your soft tissue and bones. Also, do not see a chiropractor..very dangerous with arthritis.

as others have said, back pain is often largely postural.

#34 lyric

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 01:51 AM



Lyric, is it hard to get physical therapy in england? It sounds like you can greatly benefit from it. Too many cortisone shots actually have a side effect of weakening your soft tissue and bones. Also, do not see a chiropractor..very dangerous with arthritis.

as others have said, back pain is often largely postural.


What physical therapy? I am already seeing an osteopath. He said that it isn't a good idea for me to see a physiotherapist as, besides the arthritis, my trainer (bless her cotton socks!) made me do a spinal rotation whilst lifting a 12kg Russian Kettlebell, resulting in a torn ligament or muscle. Osteopath thinks physio will aggravate it.

What's the difference between a chiropractor and an osteopath?

BTW I am aware too many cortisone shots aren't good; my specialist has given me 3 and won't give me any more for at least a year, if ever.
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#35 smishu

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 04:56 PM


What physical therapy? I am already seeing an osteopath. He said that it isn't a good idea for me to see a physiotherapist as, besides the arthritis, my trainer (bless her cotton socks!) made me do a spinal rotation whilst lifting a 12kg Russian Kettlebell, resulting in a torn ligament or muscle. Osteopath thinks physio will aggravate it.

What's the difference between a chiropractor and an osteopath?

BTW I am aware too many cortisone shots aren't good; my specialist has given me 3 and won't give me any more for at least a year, if ever.


I guess things are different in england. In america, a physical therapists have doctorate degrees and are trained in rehabilitating injuries and conditions such as arthritis safely. Personal trainers are only trained in exercise, yours clearly wasnt sure what to do in your situation. I'm not sure is an osteopath is the same as a DO in america. Chiropractors have doctorates too, but are very into manipulating the spine, and this can be dangerous in arthritis, since the bones are more prone to breakage.

#36 lyric

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 05:26 PM


I guess things are different in england. In america, a physical therapists have doctorate degrees and are trained in rehabilitating injuries and conditions such as arthritis safely. Personal trainers are only trained in exercise, yours clearly wasnt sure what to do in your situation. I'm not sure is an osteopath is the same as a DO in america. Chiropractors have doctorates too, but are very into manipulating the spine, and this can be dangerous in arthritis, since the bones are more prone to breakage.



Are you sure you are not confusing osteo arthritis with osteoperosis (brittle bone disease)? In the former, the bones are no more prone to breakage than any other; unless they are really crumbling; it's usually the cartilege and joint fluid between the joints that is dried up and affected. Anyway my osteopath is very aware of my spinal problems.
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#37 smishu

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 10:40 AM



Are you sure you are not confusing osteo arthritis with osteoperosis (brittle bone disease)? In the former, the bones are no more prone to breakage than any other; unless they are really crumbling; it's usually the cartilege and joint fluid between the joints that is dried up and affected. Anyway my osteopath is very aware of my spinal problems.



Yup, but steroids in the medications you are taking will effectively weaken the bones. You should look into getting physical therapy...its called physiotherapy in england. Its a better long term solution..medications will numb your pain, but the right exercises will strengthen your muscles so that you will have better spinal stability despite the arthritis, which will ultimately help with the pain.

#38 lyric

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 11:39 AM



Yup, but steroids in the medications you are taking will effectively weaken the bones. You should look into getting physical therapy...its called physiotherapy in england. Its a better long term solution..medications will numb your pain, but the right exercises will strengthen your muscles so that you will have better spinal stability despite the arthritis, which will ultimately help with the pain.


I have had all the steroids I am having for now.

I was told quite categorically NOT to have physiotherapy as it would aggravate the inflamed muscle or ligament.

As it happens, my back pain seems to be finally easing somewhat, a full month and more after I injured it. So I am hopeful. I have started taking fewer painkillers and lower doses.
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#39 smishu

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 10:01 AM

Exercise and Physical Therapy for Spinal Arthritis

Many people with arthritis have found substantial relief from their symptoms through physical therapy and exercise. In fact, exercise is thought to be the most effective non-drug treatment for reducing pain and improving movement for people with osteoarthritis. For those with osteoarthritis, the exercises need to be done correctly to avoid causing joint pain. Specific exercises help strengthen the muscles around the joints (removing some stress from the joints), improve joint mobility and reduce joint stiffness and pain.

#40 lyric

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 11:38 AM

Exercise and Physical Therapy for Spinal Arthritis

Many people with arthritis have found substantial relief from their symptoms through physical therapy and exercise. In fact, exercise is thought to be the most effective non-drug treatment for reducing pain and improving movement for people with osteoarthritis. For those with osteoarthritis, the exercises need to be done correctly to avoid causing joint pain. Specific exercises help strengthen the muscles around the joints (removing some stress from the joints), improve joint mobility and reduce joint stiffness and pain.


Absolutely. I agree 100%.

But I am not, at the moment, talking about spinal arthritis. That's on my left side. On my right side however, I tore a ligament or muscle, DUE TO SOME UNFORTUNATE EXERCISE MOVE WITH A 12KG RUSSIAN KETTLEBELL. It is this injury that is not advised to aggravate, not my arthritis.
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