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Can a "non-Jew" Move to Israel? - Also a bit regarding Judaism

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#41 IllNath

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 05:42 AM


Lyric is not actually telling the entirely story. Israelis can be EXTREMELY nice and friendly to non-Jews. Especially if you are a tourist.

The time Israelis seem mean is when they are dealing with other Jews (they consider them family and so they will act a little more informally around us.) Also some might have some animosity toward more ultra-orthodox Jews like Lyric. So yes, you can expect rude Israelis but you can also expect very friendly and helpful ones!


Oh okay. That I can understand, I guess many people do that all over the world. I've heard a lot of people saying that Israelis are very beautiful and very strong people. I can easily imagine :)

I have to finish my last year in highschool/college (In my country they are kind of mixed together) then I'll have a gap-year. School ends August. So my plan is to work a crappy fulltime job until January or Februrary, and then go to Israel and stay there for about 1-3 months... if I am allowed? Do you know if it's possible to stay there for that long, Pinchas? (or anybody else?) And how is Israel in Jan. and Feb? :)

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#42 lyric

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 06:55 AM

Personally I haven't experienced real rudeness; probably speaking the language and not appearing like a tourist helps so I would challenge your statement Pinchas that me being orthdox has made me a target. Or let's put it this way; I can give as good as I get, and they understand and appreciate this :)

When you say how is Israel in Jan and Feb you mean weather? (BTW I am sure you can stay for 1-3 months, it's only much longer periods that might be a problem). Unless you are in the south (eg Eilat) it's quite cold and rainy, although not like Europe or the US. Just be prepared for cold and wet weather interspersed with some glorious sunshine.
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#43 Pinchas

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 07:03 AM

Yep.

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#44 IllNath

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:31 AM

Personally I haven't experienced real rudeness; probably speaking the language and not appearing like a tourist helps so I would challenge your statement Pinchas that me being orthdox has made me a target. Or let's put it this way; I can give as good as I get, and they understand and appreciate this :)

When you say how is Israel in Jan and Feb you mean weather? (BTW I am sure you can stay for 1-3 months, it's only much longer periods that might be a problem). Unless you are in the south (eg Eilat) it's quite cold and rainy, although not like Europe or the US. Just be prepared for cold and wet weather interspersed with some glorious sunshine.


Yes I meant weather; Sad. I had a little hope inside me, that said Israel would be a bit warm in jan and feb... Winter and I don't get along that well. Then i guess I would have to go around march or April...which means I could celibrate my birthday there! wow, would be a great experience.

Lyric: You said you lived in the UK right? when speaking of money/prices, how are the prices compared to European? (northern) I mean can you buy a lot for your money in Israel or is it somewhat the same? And do you live with your family when you're in Israel or do you stay at a hotel of some sort? Got to find a decent place to live when I'm there.

Sorry for my english, it's not my first language, and if I'm not really concentrating a lot, my grammar isn't that good.

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#45 lyric

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:36 AM


Yes I meant weather; Sad. I had a little hope inside me, that said Israel would be a bit warm in jan and feb... Winter and I don't get along that well. Then i guess I would have to go around march or April...which means I could celibrate my birthday there! wow, would be a great experience.

Lyric: You said you lived in the UK right? when speaking of money/prices, how are the prices compared to European? (northern) I mean can you buy a lot for your money in Israel or is it somewhat the same? And do you live with your family when you're in Israel or do you stay at a hotel of some sort? Got to find a decent place to live when I'm there.

Sorry for my english, it's not my first language, and if I'm not really concentrating a lot, my grammar isn't that good.

- IllNath


March and April can be very pleasant and warm in Israel, Pesach time can be quite hot.

Yes I live in London UK. The UK pound has recently become weaker against the Israeli shekel. We used to get about 8 shekels to the pound now it's 5.79. So certain things are cheaper for me to buy in Israel but not as cheap as they used to be.

We neither live with our family or in a hotel; we have our own place in Israel.
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#46 IllNath

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:56 AM


March and April can be very pleasant and warm in Israel, Pesach time can be quite hot.

Yes I live in London UK. The UK pound has recently become weaker against the Israeli shekel. We used to get about 8 shekels to the pound now it's 5.79. So certain things are cheaper for me to buy in Israel but not as cheap as they used to be.

We neither live with our family or in a hotel; we have our own place in Israel.


Then I guess it's somehow the same for me. What is your overall impression of Israel as a place to live? Can one feel the tensions fx. when living near Gaza or the West bank? Also,do you speak Hebrew? If I'll stay there longer than 1 month, I would like to learn some of the "basics" actually.. Can one find schools/courses where they teach Hebrew?

Are there certain things I should be aware of, if I don't want to come off as rude when I talk to people there? Some things that are very different from European culture and socialdynamics? :)
Hope you don't mind my numerous questions :)
- IllNath

#47 Pinchas

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:57 AM

Cold is not that cold.... in the 40s...

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#48 lyric

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 10:46 AM


Then I guess it's somehow the same for me. What is your overall impression of Israel as a place to live? Can one feel the tensions fx. when living near Gaza or the West bank? Also,do you speak Hebrew? If I'll stay there longer than 1 month, I would like to learn some of the "basics" actually.. Can one find schools/courses where they teach Hebrew?

Are there certain things I should be aware of, if I don't want to come off as rude when I talk to people there? Some things that are very different from European culture and socialdynamics? :)
Hope you don't mind my numerous questions :)
- IllNath


I don't live near Gaza or the West Bank so I can't honestly say. I would love to live in Israel full time; it's not practical at the moment. Yes I speak Hebrew (I did say so in an earlier post...what IS your native language because I notice you are missing things I have said and asking them again..). You can learn Hebrew in an Ulpan which is a language school, or learn it where you are now on a commercial language system such as Rosetta Stone.
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#49 IllNath

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 10:52 AM


I don't live near Gaza or the West Bank so I can't honestly say. I would love to live in Israel full time; it's not practical at the moment. Yes I speak Hebrew (I did say so in an earlier post...what IS your native language because I notice you are missing things I have said and asking them again..). You can learn Hebrew in an Ulpan which is a language school, or learn it where you are now on a commercial language system such as Rosetta Stone.


Haha, I'm sorry, sometimes I have too many things going on at once, and I'll end up repeating myself.
I'm from Denmark, so I speak Danish :) I have no trouble speaking or writing english, but here and there there are some mistakes.. And apparently I also seem to miss the point when I read ;-)

And thank you :)
- IllNath

#50 sephardic-male

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 03:04 PM

Non-Jews can acquire Israeli nationality in one of five ways.

4. Naturalization

A person 18 years of age or older may acquire Israeli nationality by naturalization if he meets these criteria: (1) is currently in Israel, (2) has been in Israel for 3 of the 5 preceding years, (3) intends to settle in the country (4) has some knowledge of Hebrew (former Palestinian citizens are exempt from this provision), (5) renounces any and all foreign nationalities, and (6) takes an oath of loyalty to the State of Israel. Completion of all of the above requirements is not essential in all instances, however, as the Minister of the Interior at his discretion has the power (for a special reason) to waive requirements (1), (2),(4), and (5) above.

http://israpundit.bl...enship-and.html
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"If the black hats feel their beliefs will not permit them to observe the small courtesies and rituals that oil the wheels of civic life on occasions where they volunteer to interact with their fellow citizens, then let them stay in their self-wrought ghettoes and eschew public life altogether. They can't have it both ways". Barbara Kay



Broadly speaking, liberalism emphasizes individual rights and equality of opportunity. Different forms of liberalism may propose very different policies, but they are generally united by their support for a number of principles, including extensive freedom of thought and speech, limitations on the power of governments, the rule of law, the free exchange of ideas, a market or mixed economy, and a transparent system of government

#51 33948

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 08:51 AM

Sweet. Who is going to pay for my free trip to Israel.

#52 IllNath

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 02:35 AM

A few more questions just popped into my mind:

Are you aloud to to walk around with visible tattoos? Or are there places where I will be told to cover them? Certain clothing I should wear (Especially in Jerusalem) ?

How is the food in Israel compared to Europe/ USA? :)

- IllNath

#53 Pinchas

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 04:14 AM

That would depend on what the tattoo is. If it's something the locals would find offensive (ex. a figure of a babe, or a big cross, ect.) would be a good idea to cover it. In holy places - like the kotel - or areas where haradim live - like meah sharim - you want to make sure you are wearing long pants and not shorts. The idea is more modest clothing. If you are wearing a t-shirt make sure it also don't say anything offensive or have offensive pictures.

The rule is the fruits and vegetables are here are much better. Fresher and not genetically engineered like in the U.S. Cheese and dairy is also better here - much richer taste! (It is the "land of milk and honey" after all!)

Meat however is not what Israel is known for. (Most is imported from South America.)

Enjoy your trip!

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#54 starwolf

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 06:15 AM

First of all, the rules for holy sites in Israel are the same for sites belonging to any religion: Jewish, Christian, or Islamic.

Cover your shoulders, whether you are male or female.
Halter tops for women are not acceptable.
Women should not wear shorts or short skirts. However, I (man) have worn shorts to several holy sites, and never had a problem.

Tatoos: if your tattoos will offend anyone, cover them up. A swastika or picture of a pig with a keffiya will not be acceptable. Same goes for t-shirts, as Pinchas posted.

The food here is as good as most palces in Europe. "Native" food, if such exists, is similar to that of Greece.

הַתְקַשֵּׁר מַעֲדַנּוֹת כִּימָה אוֹ-מֹשְׁכוֹת כְּסִיל תְּפַתֵּחַ


doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, and the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.

#55 IllNath

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:46 AM

Thank you very much everyone! :)

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#56 Natanel

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 11:38 PM

Why not work in a Kibbutz? Room, board, and sometimes excursions, you get to learn the language, and "foreign workers" are mostly welcome (depends on the kibbutz).
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#57 int

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 12:15 AM

5. Sincere converts are considered full fledged Jews (and you wouldn't ever be required to tell anyone anyway).


Until it comes time for shidduchim..

#58 IllNath

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 12:56 PM

Why not work in a Kibbutz? Room, board, and sometimes excursions, you get to learn the language, and "foreign workers" are mostly welcome (depends on the kibbutz).


You are so right Natanel! Quite funny you wrote it, because one of my teachers suggested that a few days ago. Sounds like a very good idea! - But is it true, that there's not nearly as many as there were 20 years ago? Many of my mom's high school friends would go to a kibbutz back when they were at my age.. but that was then.

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#59 greentiger

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 02:26 PM

I just opened this topic for the first time and my first thought was also a kibbutz. They used to be quite popular for people wanting to experience israel...
You don't have to convert to live in israel. You can rest assured that there are enough non jews of all shapes and sizes around israel. I would also advise to actually go there and see it for yourself before jumping ahead and deciding you would want to live there. Maybe you will like it but you don't seem to leave a possibilty open of not liking it there.
Israelis are very open with their feelings. You don't need to guess if they love you or hate you they will let you know, but no worries, they love tourists and in the more touristy areas many will have a blast trying to show off their english speaking skills.
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#60 IllNath

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 03:07 PM

I just opened this topic for the first time and my first thought was also a kibbutz. They used to be quite popular for people wanting to experience israel...
You don't have to convert to live in israel. You can rest assured that there are enough non jews of all shapes and sizes around israel. I would also advise to actually go there and see it for yourself before jumping ahead and deciding you would want to live there. Maybe you will like it but you don't seem to leave a possibilty open of not liking it there.
Israelis are very open with their feelings. You don't need to guess if they love you or hate you they will let you know, but no worries, they love tourists and in the more touristy areas many will have a blast trying to show off their english speaking skills.


Thank you very much greentiger! I appreciate it :)
Do you live in Israel yourself or?

- Oh, indeed I am aware of the fact that I might not like it there. Afterall, I'm from Denmark and I would assert Israel and Denmark are not alike at all. I've also been reading a bit in the "Making aliyah" forum, and trying to find different opinions and feelings people have had/have when they move to Israel.

What exactly is a Kibbutz? I mean how are things like food, economy and such? (If you don't mind explaining)

:)

- IllNath





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