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Help me calculate these tips.


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#1 Xi

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 12:09 PM

1. Tip on a $12 haircut.
2. Tips on a $25 wash/cut/blow. One person washed, the other cut and blow dried.
Xi is intimidating, in an endearing sort of way. --Gretchen

#2 Psychodad

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 12:54 PM

1. 2
2. 2, 3

#3 Kalashnikover_Rebbe

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 03:48 PM

KR's tip of the day, don't get $12 haircuts :biggrin:
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#4 comfortingsong

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 09:14 PM

IMO regarding services like this:

10% is normal.
15% is nice
20% is very generous.



#5 Xi

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 09:13 AM

IMO regarding services like this:

10% is normal.
15% is nice
20% is very generous.

So you'd give $1.20 for the haircut?
Xi is intimidating, in an endearing sort of way. --Gretchen

#6 comfortingsong

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:50 AM

So you'd give $1.20 for the haircut?

I'd probably give $2. It's hard with something that costs so little because the percentage of tip comes out to be so tiny, but in general, I think those are appropriate percentages. It's become more standard to tip about 20% nowadays.

#7 politico

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 01:10 PM

10% is normal.

:nea:
zinh.

#8 Razie

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 01:46 PM

1. Tip on a $12 haircut.
2. Tips on a $25 wash/cut/blow. One person washed, the other cut and blow dried.

1. $5
2. $10, $3

There is a minimum tip, imo. If someone is cutting your hair, it's a $5 tip minimum, I don't care how cheap the cut is, unless it's truly a 2-minute buzz with razors. Then you can go down to $3.

Percentage wise, first meet the minimum dollar amounts regardless of percentage. So take the greater amount of the above and the percentage * the service

In NYC -
10% is an active insult and a gesture of dissatisfaction worse than no tip at all
15% is cheap - doing the "bare minimum"
20% is a happy customer - and effectively the average tip received - on average, reasonably satisfied customers give 20%. More is above average, less is below average.
25%+ is a good tip that will stand out as a good tip

For hair washing I tip $5 regardless of the cost of what I had done.

#9 Xi

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 08:50 PM

1. $5
2. $10, $3

There is a minimum tip, imo. If someone is cutting your hair, it's a $5 tip minimum, I don't care how cheap the cut is, unless it's truly a 2-minute buzz with razors. Then you can go down to $3.

Percentage wise, first meet the minimum dollar amounts regardless of percentage. So take the greater amount of the above and the percentage * the service

In NYC -
10% is an active insult and a gesture of dissatisfaction worse than no tip at all
15% is cheap - doing the "bare minimum"
20% is a happy customer - and effectively the average tip received - on average, reasonably satisfied customers give 20%. More is above average, less is below average.
25%+ is a good tip that will stand out as a good tip

For hair washing I tip $5 regardless of the cost of what I had done.

I agree that there is a minimum, but I don't think it's 5$ for a haircut outside the expensive parts of the city (where you couldn't get a 12$ haircut to begin with).
I also agree with the percentages, though 18% is still often acceptable / good (not cheap).
Xi is intimidating, in an endearing sort of way. --Gretchen

#10 politico

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 09:00 PM

I agree that there is a minimum, but I don't think it's 5$ for a haircut outside the expensive parts of the city (where you couldn't get a 12$ haircut to begin with).

i don't live or get my hair cut anywhere near the expensive parts of the (a, really) city and i wouldn't tip less than $5 for any salon service, even if it's under $10. at least not if i plan on ever going back.
zinh.

#11 comfortingsong

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 10:20 PM

1. $5
2. $10, $3

I think that tipping a total of $13 on a $25 service is a little crazy. That's 52%.

#12 Razie

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:28 PM

I think that tipping a total of $13 on a $25 service is a little crazy. That's 52%.

Why does the percentage matter? You say "52%" as though it carries extra weight. The argument is that percentage only kicks in above a certain threshold. So who cares what the percentage is below that?

If you and a friend sat at a table for an hour drinking refills on $2 coffee (for a total of $4) would you really think that leaving the waitress who served you $2 is a high tip? It's 50% - but who cares what the coffee costs? There is some minimum amount that is a decent thank you, and less than that just doesn't fly. If you craved a restaurants $5 french fries and ordered them with free delivery, would you really think that a $1 tip was ok for the delivery person who brought them to your door?

A tip is a reward/thank-you for (good) service. Often the people giving the service have no control over the retail prices and their service is the same whether you spent a lot or a little (say, a waiter who serves you a $20 bottle of wine or a $100 bottle of wine - same effort). The person washing hair at the fancy salon is doing the same job as the one at the cheapo place. Why does one get $5 and one gets less? I could argue you should tip the cheapo one more because she's getting paid less for the job.

#13 Razie

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 11:39 PM

btw, the threshold argument sort of works both ways, in that I think it can be used to tip a lower percentage too. If you went to a restaurant with someone and ordered 2 desserts and their best bottle - which was a $250 bottle of champagne and sat for 30 minutes, I don't think you need to tip 20%. I think you could leave a $20 tip even if it's less than 10%.

$1/drink is generally ok for *simple* bar drinks, whether they are $4 or $12.
$5/hair washing is ok even if you paid an extra $75 to get the high gloss conditioner treatment
$5 for a grocery delivery is fine, even if it's $100 worth of groceries (assuming it's not cases of seltzer and other heavy things)

For some things it makes sense to ignore the price of the service and instead give a tip that is somewhat commensurate with the effort.

#14 Xi

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 07:53 AM

A tip is a reward/thank-you for (good) service. Often the people giving the service have no control over the retail prices and their service is the same whether you spent a lot or a little (say, a waiter who serves you a $20 bottle of wine or a $100 bottle of wine - same effort). The person washing hair at the fancy salon is doing the same job as the one at the cheapo place. Why does one get $5 and one gets less? I could argue you should tip the cheapo one more because she's getting paid less for the job.

The time spent with you is often different in a cheap salon too, though. For $12 you get someone who barely speaks English, asks two questions, and spends ten minutes cutting your hair. You am pay more, and get someone who spends more time with you figuring out exactly what you want and then cutting your hair in the precise crazy way you asked for.
I prefer the $12 way, but the effort put into it is not the same.
(That said, I'd tip more if I did drive the salonist crazy, even if the total was still $12.)
Xi is intimidating, in an endearing sort of way. --Gretchen




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