Jump to content


Photo

Making Aliyah as a Student


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 casey

casey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:48 PM

I was wondering a few things:

- cost of living in haifa
- the Israeli version of medical school (I'm a sophomore on my BA in Biology)
- can I keep my american citizenship?
- how much money would it be a good idea to bring with me?

Thank you!

#2 happyduck1979

happyduck1979

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 1,296 posts

Posted 25 August 2012 - 01:20 PM

- no idea
- medical school
- yes, most that I know of do
- as much as humanly possible. The old joke "How do you make a small fortune in Israel?, Start with a big one." Is not a joke.
"Don't listen to people who try to defend what God has done to you. God is a big boy. He can take care of himself. You take care of you"-unknown comforting visitor after we lost Gabbi

Empty Cradle, Empty Heart My thoughts, rants against God, and prayers after have a still birth of a very wanted little girl in February of 2011.
Why I choose to put private information in a public location

Our Aliya Blog Lots of pictures.
Yes, still another blog. This one is about quick kosher cooking and is more like my personal recipe box
Coming soon. A blog to keep track of my other blogs.

New Site. New Stuff. New Sales. Swirsky Designs

#3 casey

casey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 25 August 2012 - 09:07 PM

- no idea
- medical school
- yes, most that I know of do
- as much as humanly possible. The old joke "How do you make a small fortune in Israel?, Start with a big one." Is not a joke.

Thank you for your response, I should be a bit less vague on the second question: I know in certain countries (i.e. France, England, South Africa) medical school is streamlined into a single degree of six years and then a residency while in the US, and possibly Israel (?) it's two degrees of four years and then a residency. I was going to move to America to go to medical school, but if the process is similar in Israel, I'd much rather just make aliyah, as it's what I wanted to do after finishing school in America.

#4 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 26 August 2012 - 12:20 PM

Where do you live now?
You could contact Nefesh B'Nefesh to find out some of these things.
Also, if you're under a certain age, I think you can get many college and graduate degrees paid for in Israel after you make aliyah by the Israeli government. (It's one of the benefits of aliyah.)
Also, there are English-language medical schools in Israel - Sackler in Tel Aviv (part of Tel Aviv University), I believe also one in Haifa and one in Beersheva as well. These are basically American programs, affiliated with New York medical schools/hospitals. Sackler has a pretty good reputation in the U.S. as well.
However, they cost almost as much as American medical schools, and the Israeli government won't pay for olim to go there, as far as I know.

#5 happyduck1979

happyduck1979

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 1,296 posts

Posted 26 August 2012 - 02:09 PM

If you do those you also need to do your residencies outside of EY (at least you did when I had friends looking into it. I am the furthest thing possible from a med school grad so definitely double check!)
"Don't listen to people who try to defend what God has done to you. God is a big boy. He can take care of himself. You take care of you"-unknown comforting visitor after we lost Gabbi

Empty Cradle, Empty Heart My thoughts, rants against God, and prayers after have a still birth of a very wanted little girl in February of 2011.
Why I choose to put private information in a public location

Our Aliya Blog Lots of pictures.
Yes, still another blog. This one is about quick kosher cooking and is more like my personal recipe box
Coming soon. A blog to keep track of my other blogs.

New Site. New Stuff. New Sales. Swirsky Designs

#6 casey

casey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 26 August 2012 - 11:11 PM

Where do you live now?
You could contact Nefesh B'Nefesh to find out some of these things.
Also, if you're under a certain age, I think you can get many college and graduate degrees paid for in Israel after you make aliyah by the Israeli government. (It's one of the benefits of aliyah.)
Also, there are English-language medical schools in Israel - Sackler in Tel Aviv (part of Tel Aviv University), I believe also one in Haifa and one in Beersheva as well. These are basically American programs, affiliated with New York medical schools/hospitals. Sackler has a pretty good reputation in the U.S. as well.
However, they cost almost as much as American medical schools, and the Israeli government won't pay for olim to go there, as far as I know.

I'd rather go to an Israeli medical school, I want to become assimilated in Israel. But I'm from South Africa.

If you do those you also need to do your residencies outside of EY (at least you did when I had friends looking into it. I am the furthest thing possible from a med school grad so definitely double check!)

Ah thank you, I also believe it was you on this forum. But someone spoke of 'hard water' what exactly is this?

Also I was thinking of possibly going to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, are there any cheap, single-friendly settlements around Jerusalem?

#7 Pinchas

Pinchas

    Make Aliyah!

  • Members
  • 13,421 posts

Posted 27 August 2012 - 03:37 AM

I think my cousin went to medical school in Hebrew University. She did a six year program like you said. That was back in the early 90's so I guess it could change. Just no doctors here all are wonderful people because they are basically working for free (i.e. don't expect to make any money in socialized medicine.)

As far a being single in Jerusalem what most singles do is split the rent of an apartment in katamon... so like you could have 3 or four people living in the same apartment and splitting the cost.

Hard water means there is a lot of minerals in the water. In Jerusalem this makes it taste bad and like white stuff (lime?) on the inside of pots when heated. Washing clothes in it doesn't work so well either without fabric softener. Most people have some sort of filters for drinking water and there are solutions to clean the pots of the lime.

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#8 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 27 August 2012 - 06:53 AM

How interesting about the water. I never noticed this when living there.

#9 casey

casey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:32 AM

I think my cousin went to medical school in Hebrew University. She did a six year program like you said. That was back in the early 90's so I guess it could change. Just no doctors here all are wonderful people because they are basically working for free (i.e. don't expect to make any money in socialized medicine.)

As far a being single in Jerusalem what most singles do is split the rent of an apartment in katamon... so like you could have 3 or four people living in the same apartment and splitting the cost.

Hard water means there is a lot of minerals in the water. In Jerusalem this makes it taste bad and like white stuff (lime?) on the inside of pots when heated. Washing clothes in it doesn't work so well either without fabric softener. Most people have some sort of filters for drinking water and there are solutions to clean the pots of the lime.


Doctors make poor salaries here in South Africa as well, but if I wanted to make money, I'd move to America. Israel makes me feel at home. It's indescribable, I don't even feel it anywhere else.

#10 Pinchas

Pinchas

    Make Aliyah!

  • Members
  • 13,421 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 04:22 AM

How interesting about the water. I never noticed this when living there.


Seriously?

Doctors make poor salaries here in South Africa as well, but if I wanted to make money, I'd move to America. Israel makes me feel at home. It's indescribable, I don't even feel it anywhere else.


Right answer! :agree:

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#11 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 06:33 AM

Seriously?



Yup. I lived there for 5 years and never noticed anything unusual about the water.

#12 Pinchas

Pinchas

    Make Aliyah!

  • Members
  • 13,421 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 07:11 AM

In Jerusalem?

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#13 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 12:02 PM

In Jerusalem?


5 years in Baka, Jerusalem.

#14 Pinchas

Pinchas

    Make Aliyah!

  • Members
  • 13,421 posts

Posted 29 August 2012 - 01:49 AM

And you drank water from the tap?

Perhaps you just aren't as sensitive to taste as the rest of us.

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#15 casey

casey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts

Posted 29 August 2012 - 10:13 AM

I think my cousin went to medical school in Hebrew University. She did a six year program like you said. That was back in the early 90's so I guess it could change. Just no doctors here all are wonderful people because they are basically working for free (i.e. don't expect to make any money in socialized medicine.)

As far a being single in Jerusalem what most singles do is split the rent of an apartment in katamon... so like you could have 3 or four people living in the same apartment and splitting the cost.

Hard water means there is a lot of minerals in the water. In Jerusalem this makes it taste bad and like white stuff (lime?) on the inside of pots when heated. Washing clothes in it doesn't work so well either without fabric softener. Most people have some sort of filters for drinking water and there are solutions to clean the pots of the lime.


Is it possible to work in the private sector medicine? Does it exist is what I mean, because housing prices (I've been looking at rentals). Oy vey is all I can say.

#16 happyduck1979

happyduck1979

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 1,296 posts

Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:39 AM

Yes. There are private sector doctors. Many also work for a kupah and keep private hours at night etc.
"Don't listen to people who try to defend what God has done to you. God is a big boy. He can take care of himself. You take care of you"-unknown comforting visitor after we lost Gabbi

Empty Cradle, Empty Heart My thoughts, rants against God, and prayers after have a still birth of a very wanted little girl in February of 2011.
Why I choose to put private information in a public location

Our Aliya Blog Lots of pictures.
Yes, still another blog. This one is about quick kosher cooking and is more like my personal recipe box
Coming soon. A blog to keep track of my other blogs.

New Site. New Stuff. New Sales. Swirsky Designs

#17 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 29 August 2012 - 06:19 PM

And you drank water from the tap?

Perhaps you just aren't as sensitive to taste as the rest of us.


Of course I drank tap water. All the time, and tons of it (it's dry there and you need to drink a lot to avoid getting dehydrated.)

I don't remember, maybe the first time I visited Israel I noticed a different taste to the tap water. But after visiting several times and living there for 5 years, as I mentioned, you simply drink the water and don't take much notice to it.
After all, there is a whole nation of Israelis drinking the water and somehow they are surviving!

#18 Pinchas

Pinchas

    Make Aliyah!

  • Members
  • 13,421 posts

Posted 02 September 2012 - 05:47 AM

AFAIK most people in Jerusalem DO have filters on their sinks. All kinds of filter systems are extremely popular as is water coolers and bottled water.

Again, we are talking about Jerusalem only who gets well water from the underground water table and not the rest of the country that gets it from the Kinneret.

You didn't notice that pots you boiled water in turned white on the inside?

Pinchas is right - micha

 

For the record, IRL he is a really nice guy! - HappyDuck, Z"L


#19 Shoshi

Shoshi

    Godol Hador

  • Members
  • 4,076 posts

Posted 02 September 2012 - 09:14 AM

AFAIK most people in Jerusalem DO have filters on their sinks. All kinds of filter systems are extremely popular as is water coolers and bottled water.

Again, we are talking about Jerusalem only who gets well water from the underground water table and not the rest of the country that gets it from the Kinneret.

You didn't notice that pots you boiled water in turned white on the inside?


When I lived there - late '90's and early 2000's - no one I knew had filters on their sinks. Maybe they have become more fashionable since then.

#20 warren

warren

    Rebbe

  • Members
  • 2,208 posts

Posted 02 September 2012 - 11:23 AM

I don't use filters. I used to filter drinking water but stopped when I decided that I probably added more bacteria with the filter than I took out other stuff.

Anyway, I somehow think Casey has more important things on his mind than hard water. Casey, talk to a shaliach. As Shoshi pointed out, you might get your education (or at least some of it) paid for by the Absorption Ministry, but it pays to find out before coming, and what expenses they might not cover. I also know someone who got the army to pay for his MD, but in return he had to give them more years than he would have otherwise. But for the most part as an army doctor you're stationed at a base, not running up hills with heavy packs or having people shoot at you and they do pay you during the time you're required to work for them.
Poe's law: without a clear indication of the author's intent, it is difficult or impossible to tell the difference between sincere extremism and an exaggerated parody of extremism

If not now, when? Because I have lunch plans.

Purple is indeed very important

The Uncertainty Principle. It proves we can't ever really know... what's going on. So it shouldn't bother you. Not being able to figure anything out. Although you will be responsible for this on the mid-term. - "A Serious Man"




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users